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Community Goes to Yahoo: The Future of TV is Not TV

· July 1, 2014

Yesterday, it was reported that Community, which had been canceled by NBC in May, was just picked up for a sixth season (at least) by Yahoo.

The creation and distribution of original programming by new entrants is a growing phenomenon.  Traditional over-the-air broadcast television is no longer the sole source of episodic programming.  As DisCo has previously noted, shows like House of Cards and Alpha House have risen to fame on web-based services like Netflix and Amazon, entirely in the absence of network backing.  Just as record labels are no longer the sole gatekeepers to music production, it is increasingly clear that television networks are no longer the gatekeeper to serialized video content.

Increased competition and disintermediation in the market for video content is unmistakably a good thing for consumers, who have more options for entertainment than ever before, and for creators and entrepreneurs, who can produce programming without needing permission or funding from existing gatekeepers.  This allows for more risk-taking and creative choices, without having to worry about what incumbents find desirable.

Competition

Some, if not all of society’s most useful innovations are the byproduct of competition. In fact, although it may sound counterintuitive, innovation often flourishes when an incumbent is threatened by a new entrant because the threat of losing users to the competition drives product improvement. The Internet and the products and companies it has enabled are no exception; companies need to constantly stay on their toes, as the next startup is ready to knock them down with a better product.